Oscar Legacy
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The 8th Academy Awards (1936)

Held at the Biltmore Bowl of the Biltmore Hotel on Thursday, March 5, 1936,
honoring movies released in 1935.

Special Award recipient D.W. Griffith, second from left, with, from left: Frank Capra, Griffith, Jean Hersholt, Henry B. Walthall, Frank Lloyd, Cecil B. DeMille, and Donald Crisp.

Special Award recipient D.W. Griffith, second from left, with, from left: Frank Capra, Griffith, Jean Hersholt, Henry B. Walthall, Frank Lloyd, Cecil B. DeMille, and Donald Crisp.

Best Picture

Mutiny on the Bounty Full Image

“Mutiny on the Bounty”

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Best Actress

Best Actress Bette Davis (“Dangerous”). Full Image

Bette Davis

Best Actress Bette Davis (“Dangerous”).

Best Director

Frank Capra Full Image

John Ford

Best Director John Ford and Victor McLaglen during filming of “The Informer.”

The Year

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UCLA Film & Television Archive
Frank Capra presenting Irving Thalberg with the Best Picture Oscar for "Mutiny on the Bounty."
  • Best Picture: “Mutiny On The Bounty”
  • Hal Mohr became the first, and only, write-in Oscar winner with his win for Best Cinematography for "A Midsummer Night’s Dream." This was the last year that write-in votes were allowed for any category.
  • On January 8, 1935, Elvis Aaron Presley was born.
  • In January 1935, Amelia Earhart became the first person to fly solo from Hawaii to California.
  • In March 1935, Persia was renamed Iran.
  • On April 16, 1935, “Fibber McGee & Molly” debuted on NBC.
  • On May 30, 1935, eventual Baseball Hall of Famer Babe Ruth appeared in his last career game, playing for the Boston Braves against the Phillies.
  • In July 1935, Porky Pig made his debut in the Looney Tunes cartoon “I Haven’t Got a Hat.”
  • On December 13, 1935, the British-made "Scrooge," the first all-talking film version of the Charles Dickens classic, opened in New York City.

Special Award

To David Wark Griffith, for his distinguished creative achievements as director and producer and his invaluable initiative and lasting contributions to the progress of the motion picture arts.

See all Nominees and Winners

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