Rule Eleven: Special Rules for the Documentary Awards - Short Subject

Please note: Failure to follow all instructions could result in disqualification.

  1. DEFINITION

    An eligible documentary film is defined as a theatrically released nonfiction motion picture dealing creatively with cultural, artistic, historical, social, scientific, economic or other subjects.  It may be photographed in actual occurrence, or may employ partial reenactment, stock footage, stills, animation, stop-motion or other techniques, as long as the emphasis is on fact and not on fiction.

  2. CATEGORIES

    The Documentary awards are divided into two categories:

    1. Documentary Feature - motion pictures with a running time of more than 40 minutes, and
    2. Documentary Short Subject - motion pictures with a running time of 40 minutes or less, including all credits.
  3. DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

    See Feature Rules

  4. DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

    1. Eligibility
      1. To be eligible for 87th Academy Awards consideration, a documentary short subject must complete a seven-day commercial run in a theater in either Los Angeles County or the Borough of Manhattan, during the eligibility period.
      2. OR

      3. The film must have won a qualifying award at a competitive film festival, as specified in the Documentary Short Subject Qualifying Festival List. Proof of the award must be submitted with the entry. The Documentary Short Subject Qualifying Festival List is available at www.oscars.org or may be obtained from the Academy.
      4. OR

      5. The film must have won a Gold, Silver or Bronze Medal award in the Academy's 2014 Student Academy Awards competition in the Documentary category.
      6. The eligibility period for documentary short subjects begins on September 1, 2013, and ends on August 31, 2014. All paperwork and entry materials, including DVDs, must be completed and received by the Academy no later than 30 days after the end of the qualifying run or the festival award win. No submissions will be accepted after 5 p.m. PT on Tuesday, September 2, 2014.
      7. The qualifying run or film festival win must take place within two years of the motion picture's completion date. The picture must be submitted in the same Awards year in which it first qualifies. Documentaries submitted for the 87th Academy Awards in any category will not be eligible for consideration in subsequent Awards years in any category.
      8. The picture must be exhibited using 35mm or 70mm film, or in a 24- or 48- frame progressive scan Digital Cinema format with a minimum projector resolution of 2048 by 1080 pixels, source image format conforming to ST 428-1:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master – Image Characteristics; image compression (if used) conforming to ISO/IEC 15444-1 (JPEG 2000), and image and sound file formats suitable for exhibition in commercial Digital Cinema sites.

        The audio in a typical Digital Cinema Package (DCP) is typically 5.1 or 7.1 channels of discrete audio and these are the preferred audio configurations. The minimum for a non-mono configuration of the audio shall be three channels as Left, Center, Right (a Left/Right configuration is not acceptable in a theatrical environment).

        The audio data shall be formatted in conformance with ST 428-2:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master – Audio Characteristics and ST 428-3:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master – Audio Channel Mapping and Channel Labeling.

      9. Screenings in the qualifying run must occur at least once daily and begin between noon and 10 p.m.  The motion picture must be exhibited for paid admission, and must be advertised during its run in a major newspaper: The New York Times, Time Out New York or The Village Voice (New York); Los Angeles Times or LA Weekly (Los Angeles).  Advertisements must have minimum dimensions of one inch by two inches and must include the theater, film title and the dates and screening times of the qualifying exhibition.  Advertising must begin on the first day of the qualifying run.
      10. Works that are essentially promotional or instructional are not eligible, nor are works that are essentially unfiltered records of performances.
      11. Only individual documentary works are eligible. This excludes from consideration such works as:
        • episodes extracted from a larger series,
        • segments taken from a single "composite" program,
        • alternate versions of ineligible works, and
        • documentary short subjects created from materials substantially taken from or cut down from completed, publicly exhibited feature-length documentaries.
      12. The significant dialogue or narration must be in English, or the entry must have English-language subtitles.
      13. Films that, in any version, receive a nontheatrical public exhibition or distribution before their qualifying run or before receiving their qualifying festival award, will not be eligible for Academy Award consideration.

        Nontheatrical distribution includes but is not limited to:
        • Broadcast and cable television
        • PPV/VOD
        • DVD distribution
        • Internet transmission
        Up to ten percent of the running time of a film is allowed to be shown in a nontheatrical medium prior to the film’s commercial qualifying run or festival win.
    2. Submission
      1. A Screening Information Form informing the Academy of the details of the qualifying run must be filed with the Awards office before the run begins.
      2. Entrants (including non-U.S. entrants) must have submitted to the Academy a fully completed Official Entry Form, 50 DVDs of the entry, without trailers or other extraneous material, capable of playing on Region 0/NTSC standard definition DVD players, and all other required materials by 5 p.m. PT on the dates listed in Paragraph IV.A.4 above.
    3. Voting
      1. Documentaries will be viewed by Documentary Branch members, who will use an averaged score system to produce an eight-picture shortlist.  Three to five nominees will then be chosen by a second round of balloting, using the averaged score system.
      2. Final voting shall be restricted to active and life Academy members who have viewed all of the nominated documentaries.
    4. Copies Required
      1. In addition to the 50 DVDs required for the first round of balloting, filmmakers whose entries are voted onto the shortlist must submit another 50 DVDs, without trailers or other extraneous material, capable of playing on Region 0/NTSC DVD players, by 5 p.m. PT five business days after the shortlist is announced.
      2. The creators of the shortlisted documentaries must submit either two 35mm or 70mm film prints or two DCP versions of the documentary.  Following the nominations screenings, one copy of the work shall become the property of the Academy Film Archive.
    5. Nominees and Award Recipients
      1. The nominee(s) should be the individual(s) most involved in the key creative aspects of the filmmaking process.  A maximum of two persons may be designated as nominees, one of whom must be the credited director who exercised directorial control, and the other of whom must have a producer or director credit.  If a producer is named, that individual must have performed a major portion of the producing functions, in accordance with Academy producer criteria.  Production companies or persons with the screen credit of executive producer, co-producer or any credit other than director or producer shall not be eligible as nominees for the motion picture.
      2. All individuals with a “Producer” or “Produced by” credit on films that reach the semifinal round will automatically be vetted.  The Documentary Branch Executive Committee will determine which producer, if any, is eligible to receive an Oscar.  In the unlikely event of a dispute, filmmakers may appeal the Committee’s decision.
    6. Advertising and Publicity Restrictions

      Only documentaries that receive nominations or Academy Awards may refer to their Academy endorsements in advertising and publicity materials.  A film that is selected for the shortlist may not identify itself as an “Academy Award finalist,” “Academy Award shortlist film” or the like except when it appears in a program consisting entirely of such films.

    7. Other Rules

      The Documentary Branch Executive Committee shall resolve all questions of eligibility or rules.

Digital Qualifications and Submission Rules

Most of the Academy's Award categories allow for eligibility for award consideration by means of digital presentation, as outlined in "Rule Two—Eligibility" in the Academy's "Rules for Distinguished Achievements."

Here is the language (in bold type) in Rule Two that applies to digital presentation:

"All eligible motion pictures must be publicly exhibited using 35mm or 70mm film, or in a 24- or 48- frame progressive scan Digital Cinema format with a minimum projector resolution of 2048 by 1080 pixels, source image format conforming to ST 428-1:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master—Image Characteristics; image compression (if used) conforming to ISO/IEC 15444-1 (JPEG 2000), and image and sound file formats suitable for exhibition in commercial Digital Cinema sites.

The audio in a typical Digital Cinema Package (DCP) is typically 5.1 or 7.1 channels of discrete audio and these are the preferred audio configurations. The minimum for a non-mono configuration of the audio shall be three channels as Left, Center, Right (a Left/Right configuration is not acceptable in a theatrical environment).

The audio data shall be formatted in conformance with ST 428-2:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master – Audio Characteristics and ST 428-3:2006 D-Cinema Distribution Master Audio Channel Mapping and Channel Labeling.

What does this mean for filmmakers?

The first thing that you will need is what is now called a Digital Cinema Package, commonly abbreviated as DCP. The SMPTE and ISO/IEC documents mentioned in the general rule are international standards that define the technical characteristics of the DCP. As a practical matter, you can rely on specialized digital cinema mastering facilities to provide you with a DCP that will comply with these standards. Your original image capture can be whatever you want (film, digital video, CGI, and so on), but ultimately you will need individual, "one per frame" digital image files for the compression step of the mastering process.

Once you choose a mastering facility, you may discuss with them the most efficient and cost-effective method of conversion for your project. Your finished DCP will be provided to you on a computer Linux-formatted HDD (hard disk drive)—typically a USB drive or preferably a universal 7200 rpm SATA drive in a CRU drive carrier.

OK. I have a DCP. What next?

For your qualification screenings, as defined in Rule Two and the special rules for the various categories, you will need to find a commercial theater equipped with a digital cinema projector that meets the requirements outlined in Rule Two, as well as a digital cinema server that will play the SMPTE DCP you have received from your mastering facility.

In practice, there are only two types of DCI-compliant digital cinema projectors that are acceptable for your qualification screenings. The first type uses DLP Digital Cinema technology licensed by Texas Instruments to projector manufacturers. Be sure your cinema has a true DLP Digital Cinema projector, one that has a pixel count of 2048 x 1080, and not one of the industrial grade DLP projectors that typically have pixel counts of 1920 x 1024 with reduced color and other image performance characteristics. The second type of projector is the Sony SXRD Ultra HiRes Cinema "4K" series intended for digital cinema applications.

There are several companies who manufacture digital cinema servers that meet the applicable SMPTE specifications, and will play DCPs that are mastered according to these specifications.

These companies include:

  • Dolby Laboratories
  • Doremi Labs
  • GDC
  • DVS
Be sure the server system in your cinema can play a SMPTE DCP as defined in Rule Two above.
If you are not sure, you may confirm with the manufacturer that the server you plan to use is "compliant" with the applicable SMPTE digital cinema specifications.

I've heard about encrypted DCPs and KDMs. What do these terms mean for me?

ENCRYPTED DCPS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED! NO KDM KEYS.

I've completed my qualification screenings. What do I need to submit to the Academy?

You will need to submit a copy of your DCP, as supplied to you by your mastering facility. As noted above, this will be a computer hard drive—typically a native SATA drive or a much-slower-to-load USB drive.

The encoding format of your DCP should be JPEG2K/Interop.
The image size for a "Flat" 1.85 aspect ratio should be 1998 x 1080.
For a 2.39 "Scope" aspect ratio, image size should be 2048 x 858.
Please specify the Target Color Gamut Data (TCGD). We prefer X'Y'Z'

** Your DCP should be pre-tested before arriving here and must be able to be played on a Dolby Showplayer DSP 100.

** Please include only one version of one film per hard drive.

Where can I find a mastering facility to make my DCP?

There are DCP mastering facilities worldwide. Please contact us for facilities in the Los Angeles area who can convert your submission to that of a legal DCP package playable on standard theater playout equipment.

** Please note that the Academy is not responsible for fixing badly transferred data.

Note: Facilities owning a DVS "Clipster" or "Fuze" product can create/author legal DCPs without encryption if enhanced with the DCP package option.

Note: There is also a non-encrypted DCP creation program that runs on Final Cut Pro 7 from Doremi Labs.
http://www.doremilabs.com/products/cinema-products/final-cut-pro-plug-in/

Remember, Digital content on a hard drive is fragile! Please ship carefully!

For more info on DCI specifications and the state of the Digital Cinema progress please go to:
http://www.dcimovies.com/DCIDigitalCinemaSystemSpecv1_2.pdf http://www.dcimovies.com/DCI_Stereoscopic_DC_Addendum.pdf

And for up to date Digital Cinema goings on go to: www.dcinematoday.com


Definition of a Commercial Venue

To be considered a commercial motion picture venue for Academy Awards purposes, a theater must meet the following criteria:

  1. Regularly show new releases
  2. Charge admission
  3. Have regular non-specialized programming open to the general public
  4. Exploit and market films through regular listings and advertising
  5. Generally run films for seven consecutive days, with multiple showings daily

If a documentary film reaches the semifinal round, all credited producers will be required to complete a Producer Eligibility Form describing the exact nature of the work they performed for the film.
Working in close cooperation with a documentary director, a documentary producer's functions include active involvement in at least two-thirds of the following (each of which are not necessarily equally weighted.)

  1. Conceiving the underlying concept or selecting the material on which the production is based
  2. Securing any necessary rights
  3. Selecting and hiring any writers and collaborating on the development of the treatment/outline
  4. Securing financing
  5. Selecting and engaging the director, when applicable
  6. Managing rights, clearances, insurance and all legal issues throughout production
  7. Selecting and securing people to film/interview
  8. Selecting and securing shooting locations
  9. Selecting and briefing the cinematographer
  10. Preparing the final budget
  11. Preparing the shooting schedule
  12. Selecting and securing all necessary production components, including equipment
  13. Designing and managing production workflow
  14. Selecting and briefing the editor and editorial staff
  15. Supervising and approving day-to-day expenditures and cost reports as they relate to the final budget
  16. Supervising the day-to-day operation of the production crew
  17. Resolving day-to-day disputes and conflicts related to the production
  18. Ongoing viewing and appraising of raw footage with the director and editor
  19. Constantly evaluating the film's progress and need for additional shooting/interviews
  20. Selecting and briefing the composer and/or music supervisor
  21. Selecting and securing all post-production/editorial equipment and managing post-production workflow
  22. Viewing and appraising all cuts
  23. Spotting music and sound effects
  24. Supervising the music recording session
  25. Supervising all sound mixing sessions
  26. Conceiving and approving titles and graphics
  27. Approving the final print (film or digital)
  28. Planning and securing distribution
  29. Collaborating on the marketing, publicity and distribution plans for the motion picture
  30. Collaborating on the plans for exploitation of the motion picture in foreign and ancillary markets
  1. Can my film play on television, cable, pay per view, on demand, the Internet, or in other similar venues and still be eligible for Academy Award consideration?
    Yes, but not before its theatrical release has begun.
  2. What about DVD sales?
    DVD sales are allowed on the first day of a theatrical run.
  3. What about schools and film festivals?
    Documentaries may play in schools and at film festivals without affecting their eligibility.
  4. Does this mean I can't run a trailer on the Internet?
    Trailers are fine as long as the footage totals no more than ten minutes or ten percent of the film's running time, whichever is less.
  5. I would like to name the executive producer as the second possible nominee for my film.
    Only individuals with a director or producer credit are eligible to receive an Oscar in the Documentary categories.
  6. The entry form only allows for two possible nominees but another person who worked on the film definitely deserves an Award.
    A maximum of two individuals may receive the Oscar for any documentary. In extremely rare circumstances, a third individual may be added on a feature documentary.
  7. My film has already opened and I didn't realize I had to submit a Theatrical Screening Information Form before that. What can I do?
    Call the Awards Office and request a form as soon as possible.
  8. My assistant filled out the form and made some mistakes. Will you make the changes?
    It is your responsibility as the filmmaker to make sure that all information on the entry form is accurate. When you sign the entry form, you are agreeing that the information on the form is correct.
  9. Does an HD-Cam or Blu-Ray meet the digital requirements?
    Only a Digital Cinema Package (DCP) meets our digital requirements.
  10. I submitted my documentary last year, but since then I've added different material and removed other material. Can I submit it again?
    No. We do not accept works in progress; the version submitted to the Academy must be the final and definitive version of your film.
  11. My film won awards at several film festivals. Can I include that information on the DVD?
    The DVD should include only the film you are submitting without any additional information or special features. DVDs must be in individual paper sleeves and must include title, running time and director name only. No artwork, contact information, company name or film logo is acceptable on the DVD labels or sleeves.
  12. What advertisements are required?
    The ad may be as simple or as elaborate as you wish. However, it must be a minimum of one inch by two inches and must include the film title, exhibition times and dates for all screenings of the film. The ad must run in The New York Times, Time Out New York or The Village Voice (New York); Los Angeles Times or LA Weekly (Los Angeles).
  13. My film was broadcast on television outside the U.S. for one night before it opened theatrically in the U.S. Is it still eligible?
    If the film received a theatrical release outside the U.S. before it was broadcast on television, and if the television broadcast was only outside the U.S., the film could still be eligible. Please contact the Awards Office with details.
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